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-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//showthread.php?t=126473)

Streamliner Oct 14, 2020 3:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sanatty (Post 9070893)
No doubt our city is short-sighted. But the actual cost for the "too expensive" proposal ten years ago would still end up costing too much. The city - unlike the county - is never strategic or bright. They could have sold any land they have downtown (can't recall if they own the land under civic concourse) for private development and - like the county - moved to one of our underserved and or underdeveloped areas and built a state of the art government campus like the county did in Kearney Mesa. Cities need to manage themselves efficiently - not build grand edifices - leave that up to the private sector! Instead we get neither a new building nor an economic benefit and get an old building draining the city of cash! So on brand for San Diego.

I agree with some of what you're saying (the City is short-sighted), but I don't think it's always strategic to sell off public land downtown for private developers to profit off of. I think they just need to utilize the land they do have more efficiently. As for a grand public edifice, I think those absolutely belong downtown. These kinds of structures have historically always been in city centers, and while the County moved many of their staff to Kearny Mesa, they will always have the County Administration building downtown right on the waterfront. I think it's arguably the most important piece of civic architecture we have in the city

mello Oct 14, 2020 6:16 PM

Reading the article about RADD at MPG it says the "initial phase" will be finished by Summer 2023.... Um its what 3 buildings that aren't very tall and look like they could be in Sorrento Mesa or UTC so why would it take three years just to build the initial phase? Based on the renderings if they are really starting construction now to build that amount of Biotech office space should take 2 years tops for the entire thing. :shrug:

SamFlood Oct 16, 2020 1:50 AM

Embarcadero Performance stage nearing completion


https://www.earthcam.com/share/temp_...2812786248.jpg


https://resource4.earthcam.net/v0/ob...JjyzaSLQ!!.jpg


https://public.earthcam.net/tJ90CoLm...amera_1/view_1

JerellO Oct 16, 2020 5:07 AM

What a great cultural addition to our city I think the redevelopment of seaport village with the aquarium and observation tower will help downtown a lot

SDfan Oct 19, 2020 1:36 AM

Can anyone explain to me why the city is rescinding the 500ft height limit downtown in the next building code update? At the last city Land Use & Housing committee meeting, staff presented the removal of the height limit from the code. It passed out unanimously.


Check out the video link below and go to 1:13:13 to hear the staffer explain.

http://sandiego.granicus.com/player/...&redirect=true

I asked a avi friend what's up, and he said this:

"So the wide horizontal length across the approach path was to not obstruct the instruments required for an aircraft to land when theres inclement weather said equipment is at each end of the runway at most airports.

Thats changing. Most aircraft now are using GPS for their approaches which doesnt require the wide berth horizontally across the approach path due to its exact precision provided.

So as this antiquated equipment transitions out if you will, that horizontal field will shorten in nature across the approach path. So in essence, you could see more mid-hi rises north of the 5 closer to the approach path.

But it'll still depend on its actual location of the project because the airport has hilly terrain on either side as you know, and that presents separate problems that i wont bore you with!"

Will O' Wisp Oct 19, 2020 8:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDfan (Post 9077468)
Can anyone explain to me why the city is rescinding the 500ft height limit downtown in the next building code update? At the last city Land Use & Housing committee meeting, staff presented the removal of the height limit from the code. It passed out unanimously.


Check out the video link below and go to 1:13:13 to hear the staffer explain.

http://sandiego.granicus.com/player/...&redirect=true

I asked a avi friend what's up, and he said this:

"So the wide horizontal length across the approach path was to not obstruct the instruments required for an aircraft to land when theres inclement weather said equipment is at each end of the runway at most airports.

Thats changing. Most aircraft now are using GPS for their approaches which doesnt require the wide berth horizontally across the approach path due to its exact precision provided.

So as this antiquated equipment transitions out if you will, that horizontal field will shorten in nature across the approach path. So in essence, you could see more mid-hi rises north of the 5 closer to the approach path.

But it'll still depend on its actual location of the project because the airport has hilly terrain on either side as you know, and that presents separate problems that i wont bore you with!"

To get a little clarity here, the city is *not* removing the 500' height limit everyone talks about, as measured from ground level to the highest architectural point. It's removing another 500' height limit, one measured from sea level to the highest architectural point.

As I've explained before, the first height limit is set at the state level by Caltrans so the city can't change it, but the city also has its own height limit at 500' above sea level. So if you built a tower on a hill 30' above the harbor, it could only be 470' from street level to rooftop. I don't really know what the reasoning was for setting it up, maybe in the pre-GPS days they were afraid of survey errors? In any case the city has already given out exemptions, the Pinnacle towers are 520' above sea level. The gains will be limited to an extra 20'-30' feet, while still being below 500' above the ground.

Your friend is on the right track with his thinking, but he's forgetting that airports also have to plan for low precision GPS approaches in addition to high precision ones, and the clear zone for a low precision GPS approach is even wider than you need for a radio wave based localizer.

Here's a comparison using KSAN. The pink is the clear zone for a non-precision LNAV GPS approach, and the yellow is the clear zone for a good old fashioned localizer.

https://i.imgur.com/Cp7yDEg.jpg

SDfan Oct 19, 2020 3:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Will O' Wisp (Post 9077688)
To get a little clarity here, the city is *not* removing the 500' height limit everyone talks about, as measured from ground level to the highest architectural point. It's removing another 500' height limit, one measured from sea level to the highest architectural point.

As I've explained before, the first height limit is set at the state level by Caltrans so the city can't change it, but the city also has its own height limit at 500' above sea level. So if you built a tower on a hill 30' above the harbor, it could only be 470' from street level to rooftop. I don't really know what the reasoning was for setting it up, maybe in the pre-GPS days they were afraid of survey errors? In any case the city has already given out exemptions, the Pinnacle towers are 520' above sea level. The gains will be limited to an extra 20'-30' feet, while still being below 500' above the ground.

Your friend is on the right track with his thinking, but he's forgetting that airports also have to plan for low precision GPS approaches in addition to high precision ones, and the clear zone for a low precision GPS approach is even wider than you need for a radio wave based localizer.

Here's a comparison using KSAN. The pink is the clear zone for a non-precision LNAV GPS approach, and the yellow is the clear zone for a good old fashioned localizer.

You're the best, Will. Thanks!

Streamliner Oct 19, 2020 5:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDfan (Post 9077887)
You're the best, Will. Thanks!

Agreed. While the Caltrans limit stays and will probably be there forever, it's really good to see that the City limit has moved. Since the 21st century downtown boom, developers have maxed out with ~470-foot towers due to that rule. Our tallest, One America Plaza is the only true 500-footer, and it's like 30 years old.

mello Oct 23, 2020 12:03 AM

I walked around the MPG/RADD site on Monday night and there has already been significant earth moving done on the southern portion of site. I will use Navy Tower as the middle. North of new building there has also been quite a bit of excavation done not as extensive as on South side. Directly behind the old Navy buildings is still flat no dirt has been moved there.

dirt patch Oct 27, 2020 10:05 PM

They should at least increase the height limit to 800 ft.: no reason why Tulsa should have taller building than San Diego. Taller cities than San Diego: Mobile, Ala, Tulsa, Ok, Omaha, Neb, louisville, Kentucky, Tampa, Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, Harford, Conn, Buffalo, NY and etc.

Boatguy619 Oct 28, 2020 4:20 PM

Sorry for the poor quality, I saw the new SD symphony testing out lighting last night. Looks awesome.

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...145d5bc_4k.jpg2020-10-28_09-12-37 by kevinbeatty, on Flickr

SamFlood Oct 28, 2020 10:58 PM

saw these on the cam last night


https://resource4.earthcam.net/v0/ob...3alHsVXA!!.jpg




https://resource4.earthcam.net/v0/ob...JjyzaSLQ!!.jpg


https://resource4.earthcam.net/v0/ob...nIWTyt9Q!!.jpg


https://public.earthcam.net/tJ90CoLm...amera_1/view_3

mello Oct 29, 2020 6:48 PM

Now if we can only get the Coronado Bridge lit up
 
Its so ridiculous that in 2020 one of America's largest tourist cities doesn't have its landmark bridge lit up at night. That is one of the most embarrassing things about SD actually. Why doesn't Erwin Jacobs just pay the 5 mill and say for 3 years call it the Qualcomm bridge they can even put their logo in the middle of it for all we care, we just want the damn thing lit. :hell:

Boatguy619 Oct 29, 2020 8:22 PM

https://www.coronado.ca.us/governmen..._oct__23__2020

Sounds like they're testing the main column lighting of the bridge next week!

Streamliner Oct 30, 2020 6:35 PM

Sorry for the big photo, but u/Madison_love posted this gorgeous pic on reddit that I wanted to share. interestingly, it's stated that this was taken at the top of The Merian. I had no idea that the Park & Market project changed names. Is UC San Diego still involved? I haven't heard much about this project in awhile.

https://i.redd.it/oof7zlq7f9w51.jpg

Dariusb Oct 30, 2020 11:38 PM

^That's a gorgeous pic!

HurricaneHugo Oct 31, 2020 5:04 AM

To think that most of those buildings in the picture weren't there 20 years ago

Will O' Wisp Oct 31, 2020 6:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 9090855)
To think that most of those buildings in the picture weren't there 20 years ago

To think of what it might be built in another 20 years...

HurricaneHugo Oct 31, 2020 10:09 AM

What do you guys think of the propositions/measures?

Any in particular that you feel strongly about?

SDfan Oct 31, 2020 8:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 9090911)
What do you guys think of the propositions/measures?

Any in particular that you feel strongly about?

Yes on Measure A
Yes on Measure B
Yes on Measure E


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