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-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//showthread.php?t=126473)

kpexpress Mar 31, 2009 5:35 AM

Thomas Jefferson School of Law has put up their crane

http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/n...2/IMG_0347.jpg

staplesla Mar 31, 2009 8:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bmfarley (Post 4167016)
There is nothing on hold, other than completing a naming rights contract for the stadium. Some things are delayed, but nothing substantively which would affect football events to the point of relocating them. The June 6 George Strait concert at Cowboy Stadium is sold out and planned to occur.. despite some unfinished parts of the stadium... like locker rooms. Who cares.

I was referring to GloryPark (the development surrounding the Cowboys Stadium/Texas Rangers Ballpark), not the stadium itself.

tdavis Mar 31, 2009 9:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4167030)
Just when you thought the SD thread was dead, it's revived by content from another city. LAME.

Sounds like you have issues. What's wrong with discussing what is working in other cities. I think collaboration is healthy.

mello Mar 31, 2009 9:09 PM

I think the main point of the Dallas discussion is this: Why would a corporation either relocate to San Diego or be really motivated to keep their operations here? Like others have mentioned many business are moving their offices to other cities because of lower cost of business, a more friendly corporate environment, and better infrastructure (airport). Just look at other Metro areas at our population level: Minneapolis and Seattle. They have a much larger corporate infrastructure and more opportunities to get decent paying jobs for young people.

San Diego hasn't even taken advantage of our strategic position on the border with Mexico for Christ's sake! So the only thing we have to offer is weather, coastline, and topography. In pure business/economic terms there is no reason for companies to come here... This is what our leaders and citizens really need to think about, how are we going to make this a vibrant metro area with decent paying (70K and up) jobs?? :shrug:

staplesla Mar 31, 2009 9:24 PM

Lack of an adequate cruise ship terminal continues to hurt SD.
 
Mickey’s Cruise Liner to Dock in Los Angeles

Well, there’s one mouse that won’t be visiting San Diego on a gangplank, as hoped. Walt Disney Co. made a much-anticipated announcement March 30 that it chose the Port of Los Angeles over San Diego as the West Coast home for its cruise ship, the Disney Wonder. It will be repositioned from its Port Canaveral base in Florida to Los Angeles in 2011.

The Los Angeles port received a two-year contract, and an extension was on the table.

(source - San Diego Business Journal)

cata77 Mar 31, 2009 10:54 PM

^ Omg :hell:

kpexpress Apr 1, 2009 3:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mello (Post 4169860)
I think the main point of the Dallas discussion is this: Why would a corporation either relocate to San Diego or be really motivated to keep their operations here? Like others have mentioned many business are moving their offices to other cities because of lower cost of business, a more friendly corporate environment, and better infrastructure (airport). Just look at other Metro areas at our population level: Minneapolis and Seattle. They have a much larger corporate infrastructure and more opportunities to get decent paying jobs for young people.

San Diego hasn't even taken advantage of our strategic position on the border with Mexico for Christ's sake! So the only thing we have to offer is weather, coastline, and topography. In pure business/economic terms there is no reason for companies to come here... This is what our leaders and citizens really need to think about, how are we going to make this a vibrant metro area with decent paying (70K and up) jobs?? :shrug:

Well said, I completely agree. I think San Diego attracts a lot of boutique industries cause of the atmosphere, and weather, but like you said what are the reasons an aggressive company would honestly stay in San Diego or locate to San Diego?

spoonman Apr 1, 2009 5:12 AM

I agree that this city isn't as friendly to business as Dallas, Atlanta or some other rapidly growing cities, but you all seem to be forgetting that we are in California, the most hostile state for business in America.

kpexpress Apr 1, 2009 3:59 PM

Just sitting at my gate in Terminal 2 of our amazing airport. I arrived an hour early to find the Delta ticket counter line stretch through the ropes, out over the pedestrian bridge and down the stairs toward the parking lot. Missed my flight and am waiting for the next one. I love Lindberg Field.

dl3000 Apr 2, 2009 1:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by staplesla (Post 4169888)
Mickey’s Cruise Liner to Dock in Los Angeles

Well, there’s one mouse that won’t be visiting San Diego on a gangplank, as hoped. Walt Disney Co. made a much-anticipated announcement March 30 that it chose the Port of Los Angeles over San Diego as the West Coast home for its cruise ship, the Disney Wonder. It will be repositioned from its Port Canaveral base in Florida to Los Angeles in 2011.

The Los Angeles port received a two-year contract, and an extension was on the table.

(source - San Diego Business Journal)

Is it me or was this obvious. The Port of LA is like a half hour from Disneyland. Sure makes it easy to keep tourists exclusively with Disney and shuttle them back and forth.

and yes the only thing that makes lindbergh any good is the weather. not the proximity to downtown. weather wont change if you build in miramar or within 60 miles of the CBD.

What pisses me off is San Diego is like one of if not THE established and developed city with the most potential that it fails to live up to in America. Maybe even the world but thats a stretch.

cata77 Apr 2, 2009 2:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4171426)
Just sitting at my gate in Terminal 2 of our amazing airport. I arrived an hour early to find the Delta ticket counter line stretch through the ropes, out over the pedestrian bridge and down the stairs toward the parking lot. Missed my flight and am waiting for the next one. I love Lindberg Field.

I too like lindberg, what i don't like is the location.

Derek Apr 3, 2009 4:23 AM

:laugh: Irony.

mello Apr 3, 2009 1:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cata77 (Post 4172504)
I too like lindberg, what i don't like is the location.


This makes no sense, what is there to like about a one runway (9400 feet long with a hill at both ends) with only two fairly small terminals and 350 acres? I really don't see much to like about that airport.

Anyway I agree with DL3000 about San Diego being the the most underachieving of America's large metro areas seeing the potential that it has. The only reason I can see for this is that we kind of use LA as a crutch because it is still within reasonable driving distance. I think if LAX were 200 miles away instead of 100 miles away we would have built a proper international airport with parallel runways for dual operations a long time ago.

When you look at Miami or Seattle they don't have a gigantic city only 100 to 130 miles away like we do so they are kind of king of their domains and can't rely on anyone else for airport and shipping infrastructure. Do you guys agree with my premise at all?

tdavis Apr 3, 2009 6:56 PM

Everyone just needs to continue to flood our local and regional leaders, airport authority, Port Authority, etc. with letters and emails. Otherwise the status quo will prevail.

cata77 Apr 3, 2009 11:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tdavis (Post 4175956)
Everyone just needs to continue to flood our local and regional leaders, airport authority, Port Authority, etc. with letters and emails. Otherwise the status quo will prevail.

I have to start doing that ;)

kpexpress Apr 4, 2009 4:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mello (Post 4175179)
This makes no sense, what is there to like about a one runway (9400 feet long with a hill at both ends) with only two fairly small terminals and 350 acres? I really don't see much to like about that airport.

Anyway I agree with DL3000 about San Diego being the the most underachieving of America's large metro areas seeing the potential that it has. The only reason I can see for this is that we kind of use LA as a crutch because it is still within reasonable driving distance. I think if LAX were 200 miles away instead of 100 miles away we would have built a proper international airport with parallel runways for dual operations a long time ago.

When you look at Miami or Seattle they don't have a gigantic city only 100 to 130 miles away like we do so they are kind of king of their domains and can't rely on anyone else for airport and shipping infrastructure. Do you guys agree with my premise at all?

I can see where you're coming from, at first I was going to say, "but wait, Boise is all alone and is rising the ranks of major biz cities and still has a small time airport, but then realized that their airport, although small, has multiple runways and significant cargo. So yes, well put.

bmfarley Apr 4, 2009 11:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dl3000 (Post 4172465)
"...weather wont change if you build in miramar or within 60 miles of the CBD. ..."

Really? I think you should clarify or retract that claim. Or, do you really know how far 60 mile is? Downtown weather is very different from El Cajon or Poway or Alpine. Granted, when rain is in the forcast...each get it. But temperatures can vary substantially.

dl3000 Apr 5, 2009 2:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bmfarley (Post 4178024)
Really? I think you should clarify or retract that claim. Or, do you really know how far 60 mile is? Downtown weather is very different from El Cajon or Poway or Alpine. Granted, when rain is in the forcast...each get it. But temperatures can vary substantially.

Then I will expand upon it. Perhaps i should say climate. Temperature doesn't have as big of an impact on an airport's capacity as storms and the like that cause delays. Heat doesnt cause delays. It and elevation just affect how much runway is necessary. Sure you can get snow on rare occasions in Ramona or maybe on that Boulevard site, but it wont be the kind to cause major delays. Even thunder storms are not a huge factor at lower altitudes where airports could be built. At least its impact would not be much different than what would be at Lindbergh. My point is that the airport would be just as effective weather wise in a 60 mile radius of the population center. It could even be more than 60.

staplesla Apr 6, 2009 6:38 PM

Cortez Hill Family Center to Expand Facilities
 
Transitional housing facility to include three-story addition and new structure.

SAN DIEGO – Construction is set to begin on an expansion of the Cortez Hill Family Center located at Ninth Ave. and Beech Street to better accommodate the needs of low-income families. This project will improve the city-owned Family Center, a 150-bed transitional housing facility for homeless families with children, which is operated by the YWCA of San Diego County.

“This expansion demonstrates San Diego’s commitment to provide housing opportunities for all segments of our society,” said Councilmember Kevin Faulconer, who represents Downtown.

On behalf of the Redevelopment Agency, Centre City Development Corporation (CCDC) is coordinating an expansion of the facility which includes a three-story addition to the existing building to provide a connection between the new and existing buildings; and a new, two-story structure which will contain a kitchen, dining room, staff offices, conference rooms, elevator, new stairways, landscaped courtyard, children's play areas and public street improvements.

“The Cortez Hill Family Center expansion project is a great example of the work being done to ensure that downtown provides housing options for all income levels,” said Jennifer LeSar, CCDC Board Member. “With this project, we continue working to meet the goals of the Community Plan by promoting diversity within downtown’s projects and neighborhoods.”

“The growth will allow the YWCA to improve service delivery to the hundreds of children and families served each year,” said Debra Zanders-Willis, Chief Operating Officer of the YWCA.

The $2 million expansion is being paid for by a mixture of public and private funds. Resources include the City of San Diego Redevelopment Agency, Federal Community Development Block Grants, Bosa Development Corporation, Price Charities and J. Peter Block Companies.

HAR Construction successfully bid and has been named general contractor for the project. The project architect is Golba Architecture Inc. The Family Center expansion construction is anticipated to conclude by October 2009.

Affordable housing production downtown has exceeded state-mandated redevelopment requirements to date, with an emphasis on units affordable to very low-income households. Nearly 20 percent of the 9,000 housing units developed since CCDC’s inception in 1975 are affordable.

The Cortez Hill Family Center was established in 2001 when the City of San Diego acquired and converted a former motel located at Ninth Avenue to create a transitional housing facility. With $5 million in funding from local, state, and federal government, the 42-unit Family Center opened in December 2002.

Since its opening, the Cortez Hill Family Center has provided meals and supportive services to homeless families with children, who are allowed to stay at the facility for up to 90 days while trying to reestablish themselves into permanent housing. Under contract to the City, the YWCA of San Diego County operates the program year-round and helps each family by offering case management services, counseling, medical care, legal services, and job placement assistance.

For more information on affordable housing being developed downtown, please visit www.ccdc.com.

cata77 Apr 7, 2009 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by staplesla (Post 4180500)
Transitional housing facility to include three-story addition and new structure.

SAN DIEGO – Construction is set to begin on an expansion of the Cortez Hill Family Center located at Ninth Ave. and Beech Street to better accommodate the needs of low-income families. This project will improve the city-owned Family Center, a 150-bed transitional housing facility for homeless families with children, which is operated by the YWCA of San Diego County.

“This expansion demonstrates San Diego’s commitment to provide housing opportunities for all segments of our society,” said Councilmember Kevin Faulconer, who represents Downtown.

On behalf of the Redevelopment Agency, Centre City Development Corporation (CCDC) is coordinating an expansion of the facility which includes a three-story addition to the existing building to provide a connection between the new and existing buildings; and a new, two-story structure which will contain a kitchen, dining room, staff offices, conference rooms, elevator, new stairways, landscaped courtyard, children's play areas and public street improvements.

“The Cortez Hill Family Center expansion project is a great example of the work being done to ensure that downtown provides housing options for all income levels,” said Jennifer LeSar, CCDC Board Member. “With this project, we continue working to meet the goals of the Community Plan by promoting diversity within downtown’s projects and neighborhoods.”

“The growth will allow the YWCA to improve service delivery to the hundreds of children and families served each year,” said Debra Zanders-Willis, Chief Operating Officer of the YWCA.

The $2 million expansion is being paid for by a mixture of public and private funds. Resources include the City of San Diego Redevelopment Agency, Federal Community Development Block Grants, Bosa Development Corporation, Price Charities and J. Peter Block Companies.

HAR Construction successfully bid and has been named general contractor for the project. The project architect is Golba Architecture Inc. The Family Center expansion construction is anticipated to conclude by October 2009.

Affordable housing production downtown has exceeded state-mandated redevelopment requirements to date, with an emphasis on units affordable to very low-income households. Nearly 20 percent of the 9,000 housing units developed since CCDC’s inception in 1975 are affordable.

The Cortez Hill Family Center was established in 2001 when the City of San Diego acquired and converted a former motel located at Ninth Avenue to create a transitional housing facility. With $5 million in funding from local, state, and federal government, the 42-unit Family Center opened in December 2002.

Since its opening, the Cortez Hill Family Center has provided meals and supportive services to homeless families with children, who are allowed to stay at the facility for up to 90 days while trying to reestablish themselves into permanent housing. Under contract to the City, the YWCA of San Diego County operates the program year-round and helps each family by offering case management services, counseling, medical care, legal services, and job placement assistance.

For more information on affordable housing being developed downtown, please visit www.ccdc.com.

hmm?? i wonder how that is going to turn out :hmmm:


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